Thursday, May 6, 2010

New book on Slavonic Pseudepigrapha

Andrei Orlov has edited a brilliant collection of essays on the Slavonic Pseudepigrapha from articles he had published previously in journals that are not readily accessible to most readers.

He examines theophanic patterns found in 2 Enoch, the Apocalypse of Abraham, and the Ladder of Jacob. He investigates divine body KAVOD traditions (measure; corporeality; bodily ascent; pillar of the world; eschatology; divine face; heavenly counterpart; resurrection) and divine name SHEM traditions (aural mysticism; liturgy; angelology; iconoclasm; fallen angels).

Andrei Orlov, Divine Manifestations in the Slavonic Pseudepigrapha, Orientalia Judaica Christiana 2 (Piscataway: Gorgias, 2009).

Orlov has posted his introduction HERE.

3 comments:

Jared said...

Looks like one to order for the library.

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Ellie K said...

I do not have a particularly good religious education, however, I think I need to remember that and improve my humility skills: I'd never heard of the Pseudepigrapha until reading your post today. Shows how much I don't know....

Though I'd heard of Apocrypha (unsure of spelling), I had no idea that both bodies of writing pertain to Judaism in a very direct way. Even if not used for formal observance, they would be of great value by providing insight into way of life and thought from 300 BC - 700 AD (approx on dates?) The moniker "Pseudepigrapha" has a negative connotation that must be doubly burdensome.

Thank you so much for your article. I read it this morning, and was so curious that I spent the following two hours discovering what I could learn at a very overview level about these writings. Now I must put M.Orlov's essay collection on my Amazon wishlist!
;@)